Métis Children’s Books

Although November 16th is the official Louis Riel Day, in Manitoba February is the month for celebrating Métis culture. The third Monday in February is Family Day in some provinces. In Manitoba it is Louis Riel Day; a statutory holiday. This day also coincides with Festival du Voyageur.

Festival du Voyageur runs from February 14-23 this year and is a celebration of all things Métis. It is also the largest winter festival in Western Canada.

We have been attending for the last few years and enjoy the food, music and outdoor entertainment very much. Here we are last year:

festival 2013

I Love to Read Month is now in full swing in most schools. As many local schools also visit the festival, it is the perfect time to explore Métis books.

Thomas and the Metis Cart / Tumaas ekwa li Michif Sharey

Written by Bonnie Murray, Illustrated by Sheldon Dawson, Translated by Rita Flamand

Tumaas

Thomas needs to make a wheeled vehicle for his science class. His father helps him make a Red River Cart and learns about his Métis heritage as he builds and completes his project.

The text can be enjoyed purely for the story and illustrations. It can also be used as an introduction to a study on Métis history or an example of a science/project fair. Written in both English and Michif this book celebrates the Michif language, providing a wonderful learning opportunity for Michif speakers or those who want to lean the language.

A Name for a Métis

Written by Deborah L. Delaronde, Illustrated by Keiron Flamand

A-name-for-a-metis

The little boy wanted another name so he went in turn to each member of his family asking what his other name should be. On his travels he develops an interest in his mother’s language, Ojibway. This honouring leads to his grandfather giving him the name of Little Métis.

Exploring names and name origins is a great way to get to know classmates and this text would be the perfect introduction.  A glossary in the back of the book gives Ojibway translations used in the text.

Little Métis and the Métis Sash

Written by Deborah L. Delaronde, Illustrated by Keiron Flamand

Little-metis

Following the same structure as A Name for a Métis, this text has Little Métis travelling to each family member in search of boredom relief. The wind plays tricks on Little Métis and gets him into trouble but he learns a lesson and receives his Métis sash.

The moral of the story, that everyone has a job or role to play in their family is clearly explained, as is the Métis sash. The Saulteaux glossary gives an additional learning tool.

I loved Her

Written by Shezza Ansloos, Illustrated by Kimberly McKay-Fleming

I Loved Her

A Métis girl fondly recollects times spent with grandmother, from singing songs to baking.

This a beautiful text and a wonderful discussion opener for a student who has suffered a loss. It could also be used a framework for creative writing or story telling.

Unusual Friendships

Written by Beatrice Culleton Mosionier, Illustrated by Rebecca Belmore

Unusual Friendships

This text of Little White Paws and Little White Rat, explores Métis themes through a dancing adventure. Written completely in rhyming pattern, the story is entertaining and provides many opportunities for discussion.

This book may also inspire readers to learn the Red River Cat Dance (the Red River Jig)!

All of these book are available at Quality Classrooms. Just click on the book image for more information.

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